Myvisajobs.com
Immigration Blog

Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker

By Bill at March 22, 2019 16:43
Filed Under: Visa Knowledge

Regular Processing

Form I-129 is filed at the California Service Center (CSC), the Vermont Service Center (VSC), the Nebraska Service Center (NSC), or the Texas Service Center (TSC), depending on which nonimmigrant classification and action the petitioner is requesting and where the petitioner is located. 

For many classifications, the U.S. state or territory where your company or organization’s primary office is located will determine where you should send your Form I-129 package. For example, if your company’s primary office is in New York, file Form I-129 with the VSC regardless of the beneficiary’s worksite. If your company’s primary office is in California, file Form I-129 with the CSC regardless of the beneficiary’s worksite.

Form I-129 petitions for certain nonimmigrant classifications and requested actions are filed at one service center, regardless of where the company or organization’s primary office is located. Currently, only certain H-1B and H-1B1 petitions are filed at the NSC.

Please refer to the “I-129 Nonimmigrant Classification Chart with Filing Locations” chart below for information regarding your specific requested nonimmigrant classification and requested action.

Filing for Temporary Employment or Training in More Than One Location

When the temporary employment or training will be in different locations within the same U.S. state or territory, or in different U.S. states or territories, the state where your company or organization’s primary office is located will still be used to determine where you should file your Form I-129 package, regardless of the beneficiary’s work location(s). For example, if the beneficiary will work or receive training in two or more different locations in the state of Arizona, and your company’s primary office is in New York, file Form I-129 with the VSC. If the beneficiary will work or receive training in a location in Arizona and in another location in Florida, and your company’s primary office is in New York, file Form I-129 with the VSC.

Listing Your Organization’s Primary Address

Your company or organization’s primary office should be listed in Part 1, Question 3.

Providing Additional Information

In addition to Part 5, Question 3, you may also use Part 9 of Form I-129 (with a revision date of 01/17/2017) to list additional worksite locations if you need extra space.

California Service Center Filings

File Form I-129 with the CSC if the petitioner’s primary office is located in:

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Guam
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming
  • If you are filing a major league sports-related P petition, you must continue to file Form I-129 with the VSC.   

Vermont Service Center Filings

File Form I-129 with the VSC if the petitioner’s primary office is located in:

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Mississippi
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • Puerto Rico
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia

Premium Processing

If you are requesting premium processing services for a Form I-129, you must also file Form I-907, Request for Premium Processing Services. Before you file the Form I-129/I-907 package, check uscis.gov to ensure that the requested classification is eligible for premium processing.

DHS Announces Final Rule for a More Effective and Efficient H-1B Visa Program

By Bill at February 08, 2019 18:08
Filed Under: Immigration News

Final Rule Effective Beginning April 1, 2019 

WASHINGTON—The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) posted today for public inspection, a final rule amending regulations governing H-1B cap-subject petitions, including those that may be eligible for the advanced degree exemption. The final rule reverses the order by which U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) selects H-1B petitions under the H-1B regular cap and the advanced degree exemption, and it introduces an electronic registration requirement for petitioners seeking to file H-1B cap-subject petitions. The rule will be published in the Federal Register on Jan. 31, and will go into effect on April 1, though the electronic registration requirement will be suspended for the fiscal year (FY) 2020 cap season. 

“These simple and smart changes are a positive benefit for employers, the foreign workers they seek to employ, and the agency’s adjudicators, helping the H-1B visa program work better,” said USCIS Director L. Francis Cissna. “The new registration system, once implemented, will lower overall costs for employers and increase government efficiency. We are also furthering President Trump’s goal of improving our immigration system by making a simple adjustment to the H-1B cap selection process. As a result, U.S. employers seeking to employ foreign workers with a U.S. master’s or higher degree will have a greater chance of selection in the H-1B lottery in years of excess demand for new H-1B visas.”

Effective April 1, USCIS will first select H-1B petitions (or registrations, once the registration requirement is implemented) submitted on behalf of all beneficiaries, including those that may be eligible for the advanced degree exemption. USCIS will then select from the remaining eligible petitions, a number projected to reach the advanced degree exemption. Changing the order in which USCIS counts these allocations will likely increase the number of petitions for beneficiaries with a master’s or higher degree from a U.S. institution of higher education to be selected under the H-1B numerical allocations. Specifically, the change will result in an estimated increase of up to 16% (or 5,340 workers) in the number of selected petitions for H-1B beneficiaries with a master’s degree or higher from a U.S. institution of higher education.

USCIS will begin accepting H-1B cap petitions for FY 2020 on April 1, 2019. The reverse selection order will apply to petitions filed for the FY 2020 H-1B cap season. Petitioners may file an H-1B petition no more than six months before the employment start date requested for the beneficiary. USCIS will provide H-1B cap filing instruction on uscis.gov in advance of the filing season.

Importantly, after considering public feedback, USCIS will be suspending the electronic registration requirement for the FY 2020 cap season to complete user testing and ensure the system and process are fully functional. Once implemented, the electronic registration requirement will require petitioners seeking to file H-1B cap petitions, including those that may be eligible for the advanced degree exemption, to first electronically register with USCIS during a designated registration period. Only those whose registrations are selected will be eligible to file an H-1B cap-subject petition. USCIS expects that the electronic registration requirement, once implemented, will reduce overall costs for petitioners and create a more efficient and cost-effective H-1B cap petition process for USCIS and petitioners.

Additionally, USCIS will publish a notice in the Federal Register to announce the initial implementation of the H-1B registration process in advance of the cap season in which it will implement the requirement. Prior to implementation, USCIS will conduct outreach to ensure petitioners understand how to access and use the system. Once implemented, USCIS will announce the designated electronic registration period at least 30 days in advance for each fiscal year it is required.

On April 18, 2017, President Trump issued the  Buy American and Hire American Executive Order, instructing DHS to “propose new rules and issue new guidance, to supersede or revise previous rules and guidance if appropriate, to protect the interests of U.S. workers in the administration of our immigration system.” The executive order specifically mentioned the H-1B program and directed DHS and other agencies to “suggest reforms to help ensure that H-1B visas are awarded to the most-skilled or highest-paid petition beneficiaries.”  

2019 H1B Visa and Green Card Reports Released

By Bill at January 04, 2019 21:42
Filed Under: Immigration News

Myvisajobs.com, the leading employment website for immigrants, has released its 14th Annual H1B Visa and Employment-based Green Card reports, which are based on more than 654,000 Labor Condition Application(LCA) and nearly 112,000 permanent labor certifications.

To help you pitch the employers who are more likely to sponsor you in 2019, we have updated all employers' contact information and added demographic profiles of their foreign workers. Click to see example profile and contact person list.

  1. 2019 Top 100 H1B Visa Sponsor
  2. 2019 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Status: Certified, Denied or Withdrawn
  3. 2019 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Job Title
  4. 2019 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Work State
  5. 2019 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Work City
  6. 2019 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Occupation
  7. 2019 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Industry
  8. 2019 Top 100 Green Card Sponsor
  9. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Status: Certified, Denied or Withdrawn
  10. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Country of Citizenship
  11. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Visa Status
  12. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Job Title
  13. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Work State
  14. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Work City
  15. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Occupation
  16. 2019 Top Green Card Sponsors by Industry

The economy added 312,000 jobs in December, far more than the 177,000 that were expected, make sure you polish your resume and update your career profiles regularly.

We are updating employers' contact information to make our customized visa job solutions more accurate and effective. Try them now!

The number of LCA includes new, renewed, transferred and cap-exempt LCA. Please visit our H-1B Visa section to learn more. 

Hatch, Flake Introduce Merit-Based, High-Skilled Immigration Bill for the 21st Century

By Bill at February 02, 2018 16:24
Filed Under: Immigration News

Washington, D.C.—Jan 25, 2018 WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Jeff Flake (R-AZ) introduced the Immigration Innovation (“I-Squared”) Act of 2018 to bring long-overdue reforms to our nation’s merit-based immigration laws for high-skilled workers. The bill focuses on areas vital to maintaining the United States’ competitiveness in the global economy: the availability of employment-based nonimmigrant visas (H-1B visas) for industries in which there is a shortage of American labor; reforms to the H-1B program to reduce fraud and help protect workers; increased access to green cards for high-skilled workers; and directing fees collected for H-1B visas and green cards to promoting STEM worker training and education. Previous versions of the bill were introduced in the last two Congresses. 

  • H–1B Visas:
    -U.S. advanced degrees: Uncaps the existing exemption (currently 20,000) for holders of U.S. master’s degrees or higher from the annual numerical limitation on H–1B visas for individuals who are being sponsored for or who will be sponsored for a green card. 
    -Statutory cap: Increases the annual base allocation of H–1B visas from 65,000 to 85,000. 
    -Market escalator: Creates a market-based escalator to allow the supply of H–1B visas to meet demand. Under the escalator, up to 110,000 additional H–1B visas (for a total of 195,000) may be granted in a fiscal year if certain demand requirements are met. 
    -Lottery prioritization: Prioritizes adjudication of cap-subject H–1B visa petitions for holders of U.S. master’s degrees or higher, holders of foreign Ph.D.’s, and holders of U.S. STEM bachelor degrees.
    -Hoarding penalties: Subjects employers who fail to employ an H–1B worker for more than 3 months during the individual’s first year of work authorization to a penalty. 
    -Prohibitions on replacement: Prohibits employers from hiring an H–1B visa holder with the purpose and intent to replace a U.S. worker. 
    -Work authorization for H–1B spouses and children: Provides work authorization for spouses and dependent children of H–1B visa holders. 
    -Worker mobility: Increases H–1B worker mobility by establishing a grace period during which H–1B visa holders can change jobs without losing legal status. 
    -Dependent employers: Updates 1998 law exempting H–1B dependent employers from certain recruitment and nondisplacement requirements. Raises from $60,000 to $100,000 the H–1B salary level at which the salary-based exemption takes effect. Narrows education-based exemption to H–1B hires with a U.S. Ph.D. Eliminates exemptions for “super-dependent” employers altogether.
  • Green Cards:
    Per-country numerical limits: Eliminates annual per-country limit for employment-based green cards and adjusts per-country caps for family-based green cards. 
    Green card recapture: Enables the recapture of green card numbers that were approved by Congress in previous years but not used. 
    Exemptions from green card cap: Exempts spouses and children of employment-based green card holders, holders of U.S. STEM master’s degrees or higher, and certain individuals with extraordinary ability in the arts and sciences from worldwide numerical caps on employment-based green cards. 
    Worker mobility: Increases worker mobility for individuals on the path to a green card by enabling such individuals to change jobs earlier in the process without losing their place in the green card line.
    Employment-based conditional green cards: Creates new conditional green card category to allow U.S. employers to sponsor university-educated foreign professionals through a separate path from H–1B.
  • Student Visas 
    Dual intent: Enables F–1 student visa holders to seek permanent resident status while a student or during Optional Practical Training (OPT).
  • STEM Education and Worker Training
    Promoting American Ingenuity Account: Increases fees for H–1B visas and employment-based green cards and directs fees toward state-administered grants to promote STEM education and worker training.

2018 H1B Visa and Green Card Reports Released

By Bill at January 12, 2018 21:12
Filed Under: Immigration News

 

Myvisajobs.com, the leading employment website for immigrants, has released its 13th Annual H1B Visa and Employment-based Green Card reports.

During the fiscal year 2017, U.S. employers submitted 624,650 labor condition applications for H-1B visas, and Department of Labor made decisions on 97,602 permanent labor certifications for green cards*.

To help you pitch the employers who are more likely to sponsor you in 2018, we have updated all employers' contact information and added demographic profiles of their foreign workers. Click to see example profile and contact person list.

  1. 2017 Top 100 H1B Visa Sponsor
  2. 2017 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Status: Certified, Denied or Withdrawn
  3. 2017 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Job Title
  4. 2017 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Work State
  5. 2017 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Work City
  6. 2017 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Occupation
  7. 2017 Top H1B Visa Sponsors by Industry
  8. 2017 Top 100 Green Card Sponsor
  9. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Status: Certified, Denied or Withdrawn
  10. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Country of Citizenship
  11. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Visa Status
  12. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Job Title
  13. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Work State
  14. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Work City
  15. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Occupation
  16. 2017 Top Green Card Sponsors by Industry
The employers are always looking for skilled workers, make sure you polish your resume and update your career profiles regularly.

We are updating employers' contact information to make Resume Blasting and Smart Apply more accurate and effective. Try them now!

*: The number of LCA includes new, renewed, transferred and cap-exempt LCA. Please visit our H-1B Visa section to learn more.

U.S. employers submitted nearly 140K LCA after April 1

By Bill at July 24, 2017 00:16
Filed Under: Immigration News
We have published all labor applications(LCA) filed by U.S. employers during the first 9 months of fiscal year 2017 through our legacy database system.

From October 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017, Department of Labor received 528,146 LCA for H-1B visa jobs: 6,989 were denied, 38,784 were withdrawn.

U.S. employers still submitted large number of LCA after April 1 when the annual quota for H-1B Visa was used up. The total number is estimated to be over 140K at the end of July. Click here to understand why.

  Year to Date First Quarter Second Quarter Third Quarter
Total LCA 528,146 93,522 326,905 107,719
Certified 482,373 80,395 305,769 96,209
Denied 6,989 1,369 4,143 1,477
Withdrawn 38,784 11,758 16,993 10,033


Please use following links to search potential job opportunities and pitch employers directly. Our new visa job database is now updated daily with full copies of original petitions. However, we still maintain the legacy system which is updated once every quarter with case summary only. Some cases might not appear on both systems due to various reasons.

U.S. employers are always looking for skilled workers, even in holiday seasons. Please polish your resume and update your career profiles regularly.

 

Department of Labor received over 423,000 labor petitions for H-1B Visa in six months

By Bill at May 23, 2016 02:02
Filed Under:

We have published all labor applications filed by U.S. employers during the first six months of fiscal year 2016 through ourlegacy database system

From October 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016, Department of Labor received 423,006 labor condition applications for H-1B visa jobs: 5,904 were denied, 33,898 were withdrawn. 

  Year to Date First Quarter Second Quarter
Total LCA 423,006 93,372 329,643
Certified 383,204 78,855 304,349
Denied 5,904 1,276 4,628
Withdrawn 33,898 13,241 20,657



Please use following links to search potential job opportunities and pitch employers directly.

Our new visa job database is now updated daily with full copies of original petitions. However, we still maintain the legacy system which is updated once every quarter with case summary only. Some cases might not appear on both systems due to various reasons. 

U.S. employers are always looking for skilled workers. Please polish your resume and update your career profiles regularly

DOL processed half million labor applications for H-1B during last 9 months

By Bill at July 29, 2015 01:18
Filed Under: Immigration News
We have published all labor applications filed by U.S. employers during the first nine months of fiscal year 2015 through ourlegacy database system

From October 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015, Department of Labor made decisions on 508,401 labor condition applications for H-1B visa jobs: 9,105 were denied, 32,515 were withdrawn(view detailed report). 

  Year to Date First Quarter Second Quarter Third Quarter
Total LCA 508,401 89,305 292,785 126,307
Certified 466,781 77,671 274,291 114,984
Denied 9,105 1,761 4,666 2,678
Withdrawn 32,515 9,915 13,955 8,845


Please use following links to search potential job opportunities and pitch employers directly. Our new visa job database is now updated daily with full copies of original petitions. However, we still maintain the legacy system which is updated once every quarter with case summary only. Some cases might not appear on both systems due to various reasons. 

U.S. employers are always looking for skilled workers, even in holiday seasons. Please polish your resume and update your career profiles regularly

Bipartisan Senate Bill Would Increase Visas and Green Cards for Foreign Workers

By Bill at January 16, 2015 01:24
Filed Under: Immigration News

On January 14, Republican and Democratic senators introduced legislation that would make it easier for U.S. employers to hire more foreign specialists in science, technology and engineering(full textsummary, AILA News Release). 

Among the bill's provisions are the following:

  • Increases the H-1B cap from 65,000 to 115,000 and allows the cap to go up (but not above 195,000) or down (but not below 115,000), depending on actual market demand.
  • Removes the existing 20,000 cap on the U.S. advanced degree exemption for H-1Bs.
  • Authorizes employment for dependent spouses of H-1B visa holders.
  • Exempts dependents of employment-based immigrant visa recipients, U.S. STEM advanced degree holders, persons with extraordinary ability, and outstanding professors and researchers from the employment-based green card cap.
  • Eliminates annual per-country limits for employment-based visa petitioners and adjusts per-country caps for family-based immigrant visas.

For more information, please review full text or summary of S. 153, Immigration Innovation ("I-Squared") Act of 2015. 

MicrosoftGoogleFacebook and Apple are among companies that have been clamoring for better access to high-skilled foreign workers. 

Analysts say the bills have a strong chance of passing both houses. "Congress seems much more amenable to high-skilled reform than they were before," said Alex Nowrasteh, an immigration policy analyst at the libertarian Cato Institute. "Republicans have been on board with expanding high-skilled immigration for a very long time. Now that they control the Senate, they can control the discussion on that, and they're going to push for more liberalization of the system than they would have gotten in a mixed Congress." 

U.S. employers are always looking for skilled workers. Please polish your resume and update your career profiles regularly.

Summary of S. 153, Immigration Innovation Act of 2015

By Bill at January 15, 2015 23:53
Filed Under:

Summary of the Immigration Innovation Act of 2015 (S. 153) by Senators Hatch (R-UT), Klobuchar (D-MN), Rubio (R-FL), Coons (D-DE), Flake (R-AZ), and Blumenthal (D-CT). (full text)

  • Employment-Based Nonimmigrant H-1B Visas
    • Increase the H-1B cap from 65,000 to 115,000
    • Allow the cap to go up (but not above 195,000) within any fiscal year where early filings exceed cap and require the cap to go down in a following fiscal year (but not below 115,000) if usage at the end of any fiscal year is below that particular year’s cap
    • Uncap the existing U.S. advanced degree exemption (currently limited to 20,000 per year)
    • Authorize employment for dependent spouses of H-1B visa holders
  • Increase worker mobility by establishing a grace period during which foreign workers can change jobs and not be out of status and restoring visa revalidation for E, H, L, O and P nonimmigrant visa categories
  • Student Visas: Allow dual intent for foreign students at U.S. colleges and universities to provide the certainty they need to ensure their future in the United States
  • Green Cards:
    • Enable the recapture of green card numbers that were approved by Congress in previous years but were not used, and continue this policy going forward through the roll-over of unused green cards in future fiscal years to the following fiscal year
    • Exempt certain categories of persons from the employment-based green card cap:
      • Dependents of employment-based immigrant visa recipients
      • U.S. STEM advance degree holders
      • Persons with extraordinary ability
      • Outstanding professors and researchers
      • Eliminate annual per-country limits for employment based visa petitioners
      • Adjust per-country caps for family-based immigrant visas
  • U.S. STEM Education & Worker Retraining Initiative: Reform fees on H-1B visas and employment-based green cards; use money from these fees to fund a grant program to promote STEM education and worker retraining to be administered by the states