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Why those 50,000 H-1B petitions were denied?

By Bill at September 23, 2017 04:46
Filed Under: Tips and Features, Visa Knowledge
In fiscal year 2016, USCIS received almost 400,000 H-1B visa petitions and approved nearly 350,000 of them(2007-2017 history). Following are the most common reasons for the denials of those 50,000 petitions.

  1. The employer does not appear to be a real, established, operating U.S. company with the capacity to hire and pay an H-1B worker. The employer has to provide documentation, such as a tax identification number, tax returns or financial statements. Website printouts, brochures, photographs of the employer's premises, and any licenses or stock certificates will also helpful.
  2. The employer fails to establish that an employer-employee relationship exists. The relationship must continue to exist with the beneficiary throughout the duration of the requested H-1B validity period. read more about employer-employee relationship
  3. The foreign worker does not have the required education or experience. H-1B occupations usually require the attainment of a bachelor degree or its equivalent in order to enter the profession. Many jobs also require other qualifications such as previous training and work experience. Professional jobs may also require state-issued licenses and professional degrees. read more about H-1B requirements
  4. The offered employment does not meet the "specialized knowledge" requirement. The H-1B visa is designed to be used for foreign workers in "speciality occupations", which require theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge in a field of human endeavor. read more about H-1B occupations
Before the H-1B petition can be filed with USCIS, the employer must fill a Labor Condition Application(LCA) with the Department of Labor. Please use following link to search denied applications:

http://www.myvisajobs.com/H1B-Visa/SearchLCA.aspx

It is autumn, time for you to update your career profile and pitch potential employers!


Fall is the best season for hiring and job search

By Bill at August 21, 2017 19:32
Filed Under: Tips and Features

In the US, recruiting and hiring is year round. However, the busiest hiring season is the fall(Labor Day through Thanksgiving). Job seekers who make contact right at the start of these cycles have the best chance of being hired! 

In September, decision makers are back from summer vacation. Hiring managers push for an increase to take advantage of remaining budget for the year. If they don't hire before January, they might lose the allocated funds for new employees. CEOs also try to reduce operating profits by incurring search fees towards the end of each year, to avoid paying taxes! 

The slowest season for hiring and job hunting are the holiday season(Thanksgiving through New Year's) and summertime (Memorial Day through mid-August). That's why the employers want to get new recruits in before December. 

The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 4.3% in July 2017, the lowest level in 16 years(about 2.3% for computer professionals, 3.0% for engineers and 2.4% for business and management occupations). 

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (4.0 percent), adult women (4.0 percent), teenagers (13.2 percent), Whites (3.8 percent), Blacks (7.4 percent), Asians (3.8 percent), and Hispanics (5.1 percent) showed little or no change in July. Now is the best time to start job search, take actions now!

  1. Conduct a self-assessment to determine skills and talents, then update your career profile.
  2. Use real time H1B database to conduct market research, and identify employers in need of your skills and talents.
  3. Craft an industry-specific resume and cover letter, and upload them to job candidate database.
  4. Utilize Resume Blasting Service and Smart Apply Service to pitch large number of employers.
  5. Negotiate and evaluate job offers by researching how similar H1B jobs are paid.

2017 H-1B Visa Filing: Start Applying For Jobs Now!

By Bill at November 30, 2016 19:24
Filed Under: Immigration News, Tips and Features
December hiring is at low levels in many industries. However, we still strongly encourage you take proactive actions now to apply for new jobs and contact visa sponsors directly. Here are the reasons:
  1. USCIS will start accepting cap-subject H-1B Visa petitions on April 1, 2017. It is only four months away.
  2. Applications tend to slow down during the holiday season more than openings do -- tipping the balance in favor of those who do apply!
  3. Hiring managers and CEOs will typically try to reduce their operating profits by incurring search fees towards the end of each year, to avoid paying taxes. They also do not want to lose the allocated funds for new employees.
  4. Job growth is still very strong. The economy has added an average of 181,000 jobs a month in 2016, and the unemployment rate was still only 4.9%.
Following are some actions we suggest you take right away:
  1. Update your contact, skills and resume, so employers can find you and contact you directly.
  2. Be proactive: We are still working on 2017 visa reports. But you can still search 2016 H1B Visa, Green Card, and Wage Determination to find potential employers and pitch them directly.
  3. Be informed: Check E-Verify Employer Database and USCIS Employer Blacklist, so you will not become a victim of visa scam. Bookmark those pages, as we update them regularly.
  4. Be smart: Use our Resume Blast Service and Smart Apply Service to save time and target right employers.



Not all jobs are created equal!
http://www.myvisajobs.com

Best season to find a visa job

By Bill at August 21, 2016 18:32
Filed Under: Tips and Features, Visa Knowledge
In the US, recruiting and hiring is year round. However, the busiest hiring season is the autumn(Labor Day through Thanksgiving). Job seekers who make contact right at the start of these cycles have the best chance of being hired! 

In September, decision makers are back from summer vacation. Hiring managers push for an increase to take advantage of remaining budget for the year. If they don't hire before January, they might lose the allocated funds for new employees. CEOs also try to reduce operating profits by incurring search fees towards the end of each year, to avoid paying taxes! 

The slowest season for hiring and job hunting are the holiday season(Thanksgiving through New Year's) and summertime (Memorial Day through mid-August). That's why the employers want to get new recruits in before December. 

The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 4.9% in July 2016(about 2.9% for computer professionals, 1.7% for engineers and 2.4% for business and management occupations). Now is the best time to start job search, take actions now!
  1. Conduct a self-assessment to determine skills and talents, then update your career profile.
  2. Use real time H1B database to conduct market research, and identify employers in need of your skills and talents.
  3. Craft an industry-specific resume and cover letter, and upload them to job candidate database.
  4. Utilize Resume Blasting Service and Smart Apply Service to pitch large number of employers.
  5. Negotiate and evaluate job offers by researching how similar H1B jobs are paid.


Not all jobs are created equal!
http://www.myvisajobs.com

FAQs: Employment Authorization for Certain H-4 Dependent Spouses

By Bill at April 21, 2016 00:27
Filed Under: Immigration News, Tips and Features, Visa Knowledge

Frequently Asked Questions

Determining If You Are Eligible to Apply for Employment Authorization

1.As an H-4 nonimmigrant, would my employment authorization be limited to just my H-1B spouse’s time under AC21? For example, if my H-1B spouse’s petition is approved for the remaining time left in the 6-year period of admission plus the one year under AC21 §§ 106(a) and (b), and my H-4 status is granted the same period of time, how long will my employment authorization be valid for?

Your employment authorization expiration date generally will match your H-4 nonimmigrant status expiration date. USCIS may grant employment authorization for the maximum time allowed even if the AC21 §§ 106(a) and (b) portion of your H-1B spouse’s extension is only for part of the full validity period. Under this scenario, your H-1B spouse’s extension has been granted under AC21 §§ 106(a) and (b), so you would be eligible for employment authorization for as long as your H-4 status is valid

2.Is this a one-time opportunity?

No, this is not a one-time opportunity. If you are a H-4 nonimmigrant who obtains employment authorization under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26), you may file to renew your employment authorization and receive a new EAD as long as you remain eligible for employment authorization as described in 8 CFR 214.2(h)(9)(iv).

3.Do I need to be in the United States to apply for employment authorization based on my H-4 status?

Yes, you must be in the United States to apply for employment authorization. You must be in H-4 status to be eligible for employment authorization, and an individual outside of the United States cannot be in H-4 status.

4.Am I eligible for employment authorization if USCIS revoked my H-1B spouse’s approved Form I-140 petition?

In order to qualify for employment authorization as an H-4 nonimmigrant, your H-1B spouse must have been granted H-1B status under sections 106(a) and (b) of AC21 or be the beneficiary of an approved Form I-140. If USCIS revokes the Form I-140 petition, your H-1B spouse is no longer the beneficiary of an approved Form I-140. Therefore, you would not qualify for employment authorization based on that eligibility criterion. You may still qualify for employment authorization if your H-1B spouse has received an extension of stay under sections 106(a) or (b) of AC21.

5.My H-1B spouse’s approved Form I-140 was filed by a previous employer. Am I eligible for employment authorization?

For you to qualify for employment authorization based on your H-4 status, your H-1B spouse must have been granted H-1B status under sections 106(a) and (b) of AC21 or be the beneficiary of an approved Form I-140. USCIS does not require that the approved Form I-140 be filed by your spouse’s current employer or by the same employer who filed your H-1B spouse’sForm I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker.

6.What happens to my employment authorization if USCIS revokes my H-1B spouse’s Form I-140?

We have the discretion to revoke your employment authorization if your H-1B spouse no longer has an approved Form I-140 or is no longer eligible for H-1B status under sections 106(a) and (b) of AC21. Both you and your H-1B spouse must be maintaining your nonimmigrant status for you to be eligible for employment authorization under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26).

7.If I am granted H-4 employment authorization, can I work anywhere (including starting my own business)?

Yes. If you are granted employment authorization based on your H-4 status, your employment authorization is unrestricted. This means that your employment authorization is not limited to a specific employer. It also does not prohibit self-employment or starting a business.

8.Can I employ other people?

As noted above, employment authorization based on H-4 status under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26) is unrestricted. Such employment authorization does not prohibit self-employment, including situations where the H-4 nonimmigrant hires individuals as employees of their business.

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Applying for Employment Authorization

1.Can I file the following applications/petitions concurrently?

a.An H-1B extension of stay petition, an H-4 extension of stay application, and an application for employment authorization?

Yes. You may file your Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization together with your Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status and the Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker filed on behalf of your H-1B spouse. For extensions of nonimmigrant status, the Form I-129 for your H-1B spouse can be filed no more than six months before the date that the employer needs your spouse to work.

b. A new H-1B petition, a new H-4 change of status application, and an application for employment authorization?

Yes, but this scenario is possible only if your H-1B spouse has an approved Form I-140 or is requesting an extension of stay under sections 106(a) and (b) of AC21. Your spouse’s employer can file Form I-129 for your H-1B spouse no more than six months before the date the employer needs your spouse to work.

Please note that under this scenario, we cannot adjudicate your Form I-765 until we make a determination about both your H-1B spouse’s eligibility for H-1B status under sections 106(a) and (b) of AC21 and your eligibility for H-4 nonimmigrant status.

In either of the above scenarios, USCIS will not begin the 90-day interim EAD clock until we make a decision on your spouse’s H-1B status and your H-4 status.

c. A Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, and an application for employment authorization under category (c)(26) at the Lockbox address for Form I-765 category (c)(26)?

No. You cannot file a Form I-765 for category (c)(26) together with a Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence of Adjust Status at the Lockbox address for Form I-765 category (c)(26). If filing a Form I-485, you must follow the Form I-485 filing instructions and submit your Form I-485 to the correct filing address for that form. If you file a Form I-765 together with a Form I-485 at the filing address for Form I-765 category (c)(26), USCIS will reject your Form I-485 and any corresponding fees. Additionally, if you included the fees for both forms on the same check or money order, USCIS may also reject your Form I-765 for category (c)(26). Filing a Form I-765 for category (c)(26) at locations noted for a Form I-485 locations may result in processing delays. If you are filing Form I-765 together with Form I-485 at the I-485 filing locations,you should specify your work eligibility category as “(c)(9)” and pay only the Form I-485 filing fee (and not the Form I-765 filing fee) to avoid processing delays.

2.Where should I File Form I-765 for category (c)(26)?

For information on where to file a Form I-765 for category (c)(26), please visit the Employment Authorization for Certain H-4 Dependent Spouses Web page. Please note, filing Form I-765 for category (c)(26) at locations other than those noted may result in processing delays or rejection.

3.Will the Form I-765 be a paper-based application, or will it be an electronic application?

If you are applying for employment authorization based on your H-4 nonimmigrant status, you must file a paper Form I-765 application. We will not accept electronic Form I-765 applications.

4. There are multiple versions of Form I-765. What version of Form I-765 should I use?

While USCIS is currently accepting the older versions of Form I-765 with edition dates of 02/13/15, 05/27/08 or later, we encourage H-4 applicants to use the newer version with an edition date of 11/04/15 in order to prevent delays or the need for USCIS to issue you a request for evidence.

5. What evidence should I, as an H-4 nonimmigrant, submit to demonstrate my eligibility for employment authorization?

When applying for employment authorization based on your H-4 nonimmigrant status, submit the following with your application to demonstrate eligibility:

  • Evidence of your H-4 nonimmigrant status;
  • Evidence of your qualifying spousal relationship with the H-1B principal nonimmigrant (such as a copy of your marriage certificate);
  • Evidence of your spouse’s H-1B nonimmigrant status, such as:
    • A copy of Form I-797, Notice of Approval, for Form I-129 filed on your H-1B spouse’s behalf (if already approved and not being filed with your application for employment authorization);
    • A copy of your H-1B spouse’s Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record;
    • The receipt number of the approved Form I-129 filed on behalf of your H-1B spouse (if already approved and not being filed with your application for employment authorization); and/or
    • A legible copy of the personal data pages of your H-1B spouse’s passport, the visas on which he or she last entered the United States, and the latest U.S. admission stamps in his or her passport.
    • If you are applying for employment authorization based on your spouse’s grant of H-1B status under AC21 §§ 106(a) and (b), include the following evidence:
  • Evidence that your H-1B spouse is the beneficiary of a Permanent Labor Certification Application filed at least 365 days before the expiration of his or her six-year limitation of stay as an H-1B nonimmigrant. Such evidence may include, but is not limited to:
    • A copy of a print out from the Department of Labor’s (DOL’s) website or other correspondence from DOL showing the status of the Permanent Labor Certification Application filed on your H-1B spouse’s behalf; or
    • If DOL certified the Permanent Labor Certification, a copy of Form I-797, Notice of Receipt, for Form I-140 establishing that Form I-140 was filed within 180 days of DOL certifying the Permanent Labor Certification Application; OR
  • Evidence that your H-1B spouse’s Form I-140 was filed at least 365 days before the expiration of his or her six-year limitation of stay as an H-1B, and the Form I-140 remains pending. Such evidence may include, but is not limited to:
  • A copy of your H-1B spouse’s Form I-797 Receipt Notice for Form I-140; or
  • The receipt number of your H-1B spouse’s the pending Form I-140 filed on behalf of the H-1B spouse.
  • If you are applying for employment authorization based on your spouse being a beneficiary of an approved Form I-140, include evidence that the Form I-140 filed on your H-1B spouse’s behalf has been approved. Such evidence may include, but is not limited to:
    • A copy of the Form I-797 Approval Notice for Form I-140; or
    • A copy of the Form I-797 Receipt Notice for Form I-140 along with an explanation about why the Form I-797 Approval Notice is unavailable.

If you cannot submit the evidence listed on the Basis for Work Authorization section, you must demonstrate your inability to submit such evidence and instead submit secondary evidence, such as an attestation that lists information about the underlying Form I-129 or Form I-140 petition.

Such attestation can include the receipt number of the most current Form I-129 extension of stay filed on your H-1B spouse’s behalf or the receipt number of the approved Form I-140 petition filed on your H-1B spouse’s behalf, and the petitioner’s/beneficiary’s names in the underlying Form I-129 or I-140. If you cannot obtain such secondary evidence, explain your inability to do so and submit two or more sworn affidavits by non-parties who have direct knowledge of the relevant events and circumstances.

6. Will USCIS require me to submit original documents with my application for employment authorization?

As noted in the instructions for Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, you may submit a legible photocopy of an original document with your application, unless we later specifically request the original document in a request for evidence. If you submit original documents when not required, those documents may remain a part of the record and will not be automatically returned.

7. Will premium processing be available for Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization?

No. Premium processing is not available for Form I-765 applications filed by H-4 dependent spouses under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26).

8. What if my Form I-539 for H-4 status is still pending on May 26, 2015? Can I file Form I-765 immediately? Will USCIS match my Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization to my pending Form I-539?

If you have filed a Form I-539 and it is still pending on May 26, 2015, we encourage you to wait until your Form I-539 has been adjudicated before filing a Form I-765. This will prevent delays in the adjudication of your Form I-765. Additionally, because we anticipate a high volume of filings, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to match your Form I-765 with your Form I-539.

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How We Will Adjudicate Your Application for Employment Authorization (Form I-765)

1.Will USCIS cut off Forms I-765 after receiving the anticipated number of applications stated in the rule?

No. There is no cap on Forms I-765 filed based on H-4 dependent spouse eligibility under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26).

2.Does USCIS expect any changes to the Form I-140 immigrant petition process based on this regulation change?

No. We do not anticipate any changes in the way officers adjudicate Form I-140 immigrant petitions.

3.I am an F-1 nonimmigrant who possesses Optional Practical Training (OPT) employment authorization. Would there be continuous employment if I file a petition requesting H-4 nonimmigrant status concurrently with an EAD?

As an F-1 nonimmigrant who has employment authorization under OPT, you are allowed to work only as long as the OPT authorization remains valid. Filing an application to change status from F-1 to H-4 nonimmigrant status and/or an application for employment authorization based on H-4 status does not extend your employment authorization under OPT or any previously granted employment authorization. If you file a Form I-539 requesting to change your nonimmigrant status to H-4 and you include a Form I-765, we will adjudicate your Form I-765 only after we adjudicate your Form I-539 and grant you H-4 status.

4.Will USCIS backdate the beginning validity date on the EAD to the start of my H-4 status if the Form I-539 is adjudicated before Form I-765?

No. We will not backdate the validity date of your EAD to the time your H-4 status was granted. Your EAD will be valid beginning on the date that USCIS adjudicates your Form I-765 or the date you acquire qualifying H-4 status, whichever is later. Additionally, your EAD will expire when your H-4 nonimmigrant status expires.

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While Waiting for USCIS to Adjudicate Your Application for Employment Authorization (Form I-765)

1.Can I travel while my Form I-765 is pending?

You may travel if you are in valid H-4 status and meet all the admission requirements, including having a valid H-4 nonimmigrant visa. However, traveling outside of the United States could cause delays in your case. While you are outside of the United States, we may need additional information to make a decision on your Form I-765 or we may issue a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) with an opportunity to respond. If you do not respond on time to a Request for Evidence (RFE) or to the NOID, we may deny your case as abandoned. Additionally, travel outside of the United States may also cause possible delays if we need to reschedule your appointment at an Application Support Center.

Finally, please note that if you file Form I-765 concurrently with Form I-539 requesting a change to H-4 status from a different nonimmigrant classification, we will deny your Form I-539 as abandoned if you travel abroad while your Form I-539 is pending. In this case, we would also deny your Form I-765.

If you choose to depart from the United States before your pending change of status application is approved, we will deny your Form I-539 and Form I-765, even if you are re-admitted as an H-4 nonimmigrant.  In such cases, after being admitted into the United States as an H-4 nonimmigrant, you will need to a file a new Form I-765.

2.How long will it take USCIS to adjudicate my Form I-765?

The timeline will vary from case-to-case. Currently, the processing time for Form I-765 is 90 days (3 months). Please note that if you file a Form I-765 based on your H-4 nonimmigrant status under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26) concurrently with a Form I-129 and Form I-539, the processing timeline will not begin until we have made a decision on your spouse’s eligibility for H-1B status and/or your eligibility for H-4 status. Processing may also be delayed if the evidence included with these benefit requests does not establish eligibility and we need to issue an RFE or NOID.

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Once You Receive Employment Authorization

1.Can I use my EAD to enter and exit the country?

No. An EAD issued to an H-4 dependent spouse under 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(26) is not an entry document. If you have H-4 nonimmigrant status and depart the United States, you must use your valid passport and H-4 nonimmigrant visa (unless you are visa exempt) or other travel document to return to the United States.

How to Find a Cap-Exempt H-1B Job

By Bill at April 15, 2016 02:48
Filed Under: Immigration News, Tips and Features, Visa Knowledge

USCIS has reached the congressionally mandated H-1B cap for fiscal year 2017 on April 7. However, USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions that are otherwise exempt from the cap. 

Petitions for new H-1B employment are exempt from the annual cap if the beneficiaries will work at

Petitions filed on behalf of current or former H-1B workers who have been counted previously against the cap, and who still retain their cap number, also do not count toward the cap. Accordingly, USCIS will continue to process fiscal year 2016 and 2017 petitions filed to:

  • Extend the amount of time a current H-1B worker may remain in the United States.
  • Change the terms of employment for current H-1B workers.
  • Allow current H-1B workers to change employers.
  • Allow current H-1B workers to work concurrently in a second H-1B position.
  • Allow recapture of the time that H-1B workers spent outside the U.S.
  • Change status back to H-1B from other status like H-4 or F-1.

Checklist for H-1B Visa Filing

By Bill at March 27, 2016 18:24
Filed Under: Immigration News, Tips and Features
USCIS will begin accepting H-1B petitions subject to the fiscal year 2017 cap on April 1. All H-1B petitioners must follow all statutory and regulatory requirements as they prepare petitions, in order to avoid delays in processing and possible requests for evidence. 

USCIS has developed detailed information, including an optional checklist, Form M-735, Optional Checklist for Form I-129 H-1B Filings, on how to complete and submit an H-1B petition. Please review carefully and be aware that a new law has changed filing fees for some employers

Cases will be considered accepted on the date USCIS takes possession of a properly filed petition with the correct fee. If USCIS receives an excess of petitions during the first five business days, the agency will use a computer-generated lottery system to randomly select the number of petitions required to meet the cap. USCIS will reject all unselected petitions that are subject to the cap as well as any petitions received after the cap has closed. 

Following are more tips and knowledge about H-1B petition: U.S. employers are expected to file more than 150,000 labor condition application for H-1B visa in April. It is time for you toupdate your career profile and pitch potential employers now

How to Make Sure Your H-1B Petition Is Properly Filed

By Bill at March 19, 2016 16:45
Filed Under: Immigration News, Tips and Features, Visa Knowledge
USCIS will begin accepting H-1B petitions subject to the FY 2017 cap on April 1, 2016. Please read this mail carefully to ensure your employer or attorney file the petition properly!
  1. Complete all sections of the Form I-129 petition, including the H Classification Supplement and the H-1B Data Collection and Filing Fee Exemption Supplement.
  2. Make sure each form has an original signature, preferably in black ink.
  3. Include signed checks or money orders with the correct fee amount.
  4. Submit all required documentation and evidence with the petition at the time of filing to ensure timely processing.
  5. Ensure there is only one H-1B position for the beneficiary of each petition.
  6. You must file the petition to the correct USCIS service center.
Following are more tips and knowledge about H-1B petition, PLEASE READ! USCIS employees use the information provided in Sections 2 and 3 (or Part C) of the H-1B Data Collection and Filing Fee Exemption Supplement to help us determine if a petition is subject to the congressionally mandated cap of 65,000 H-1B visas. 

An advanced degree exemption is available for the first 20,000 petitions filed for a beneficiary who has obtained a U.S. master's degree or higher. Once that limit is reached, any petitions filed for beneficiaries with a U.S. master's degree or higher will be subject to the regular cap, unless exempt for other reasons.more details

Take actions in December to get job offers in spring

By Bill at December 09, 2015 02:26
Filed Under: Tips and Features
December hiring is at low levels in many industries. However, we still strongly encourage you take proactive actions now to apply for new jobs and contact visa sponsors directly. Here are the reasons:
  1. USCIS will start accepting cap-subject H-1B Visa petitions on April 1, 2016 for fiscal year 2017. It is only three and half months away.
  2. Applications tend to slow down during the holiday season more than openings do -- tipping the balance in favor of those who do apply!
  3. Hiring managers and CEOs will typically try to reduce their operating profits by incurring search fees towards the end of each year, to avoid paying taxes. They also do not want to lose the allocated funds for new employees.
  4. Job growth is still very strong. In November, U.S. employers added 211,000 new jobs, and the unemployment rate was still only 5%.
Following are some actions we suggest you take right away: 
  1. Update your contact, skills and resume, so employers can find you and contact you directly.
  2. Be proactive: We are still working on 2016 visa reports. But you can still search 2015 H1B VisaGreen Card, andWage Determination to find potential employers and pitch them directly.
  3. Be informed: Check E-Verify Employer Database and USCIS Employer Blacklist, so you will not become a victim of visa scam. Bookmark those pages, as we update them regularly.
  4. Be smart: Use our Resume Blast Service and Smart Apply Service to save time and target right employers.

Interviewing Strategies for International Students

By Bill at September 07, 2015 19:19
Filed Under: Tips and Features

Interviewing Strategies for International Students

Excerpt  from The International Advantage Get Noticed. Get Hired! by Marcelo Barros

 

Before we continue to review Fang Wang’s interview experience and preparation, take a look at some interview strategies that are of particular importance to international students:

 

·       - Take a moment to think about your responses before you speak. You may need a bit more time to process a question and gather your thoughts. It’s okay to pause for two or three seconds before you answer. Just make sure that the length of the pause doesn’t make the interviewer uncomfortable. Practice with your advisor. Buying yourself a few seconds before answering a question can be very helpful. It’s also a sign that you think before you speak.

·       - Are you talking too fast? Probably. Practice speaking slowly. Some international students talk too fast, particularly in stressful situations like interviewing. Learn how to speak slowly—it’s a sign of control, and it often helps people more easily understand you.

·       - Practice informality. International students tend to be too formal during interviews. Many international students are used to a more formal professional environment. Much of this formality is rooted in culture and/or linguistics—or, sometimes, nervousness. Remember to relax. Try to enjoy the moment and create an environment where your conversation can be relaxed and enjoyable.

·      - Again, it’s a conversation. Remember that when interviewing. From a delivery standpoint, your words must flow like normal conversation. From a strategy standpoint, you must find a way to showcase your skills to employers in a manner that is natural to you.

·       If you’re confused by a question, it’s okay to say, “Could you please clarify your question? I didn’t quite understand what you said,” and hope the interviewer will ask the question in a different way. Seeking clarification for language reasons is not ideal, since it could raise red flags about your language ability, but it’s much better than providing an answer that doesn’t match the question. Ask for clarification more than once or twice, however, and you may be out of the contest. 

·       If you struggle with specific English words or sounds—as I do—avoid using them during an interview. Occasionally a word pops into my brain that my mouth and tongue are not ready to say correctly. What do I do? I discard it and look for a synonym. Choose words you can say with confidence. Your English tutor will help you recognize specific English sounds that trip you up. For example, the word “specificity” is difficult for me to pronounce correctly, but I can say “precision” with no problem. If you mispronounce a word, just move on. It will happen. It’s really not a big deal. You can even laugh at yourself. Remember that self-confidence is critical.

Y   You will receive specific questions about your skills and competency. Answer questions in a direct way. As we discussed earlier, remember how Americans are most comfortable communicating. Don’t leave the interviewer guessing what you’re good at. Demonstrate self-awareness and self-confidence. You can soften what you’re saying with phrases like “I believe I am good at…” or “I feel I excel in…” An appropriate statement might be: I feel I am quite strong with JavaScript. Programming comes easily to me. My peers tell me I am fast, and for the most part my code is bug-free. I’d be happy to show you some samples of my work.

·       When given the opportunity to ask questions, consider a few categories that are of particular interest for international students. Innovation is an elusive idea but one that international students can positively impact because of their unique background. Another interesting area to mine for thoughtful questions is growth. These days, growth is often tied to international investments and sometimes acquisitions, which are areas in which the background of international students can shine. You should be able to speak intelligently about these topics.

·       - Formulate a strategy. Choose ahead of time two or three key messages you want to convey to the interviewer. At a minimum, you know that you will have to show the connections between what you have done previously and the role you want, show evidence that you can successfully perform the duties of the role you are applying for, and show that you fit.

·       Partner with your career coach to generate interview strategies that account for variables like your command of English, your understanding of U.S. culture, the role you’re interviewing for, and what you’ll be graded on when interviewing. 

The International Advantage Get Noticed. Get Hired!

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